Universal Grammar and American Sign Language

Universal Grammar and American Sign Language
Author : D.C. Lillo-Martin
Publisher : Springer Science & Business Media
Total Pages : 245
Release : 2012-12-06
ISBN 10 : 9789401134682
ISBN 13 : 9401134685
Language : EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Universal Grammar and American Sign Language Book Description:

AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE American Sign Language (ASL) is the visual-gestural language used by most of the deaf community in the United States and parts of Canada. On the surface, this language (as all signed languages) seems radically different from the spoken languages which have been used to formulate theories of linguistic princi ples and parameters. However, the position taken in this book is that when the surface effects of modality are stripped away, ASL will be seen to follow many of the patterns proposed as universals for human language. If these theoretical constructs are meant to hold for language in general, then they should hold for natural human language in any modality; and ifASL is such a natural human language, then it too must be accounted for by any adequate theory of Universal Grammar. For this rea son, the study of ASL can be vital for proposed theories of Universal Grammar. Recent work in several theoretical frameworks of syntax as well as phonology have argued that indeed, ASL is such a lan guage. I will assume then, that principles of Universal Gram mar, and principles that derive from it, are applicable to ASL, and in fact that ASL can serve as one of the languages which test Universal Grammar. There is an important distinction to be drawn, however, be tween what is called here 'American Sign Language', and other forms of manual communication.


RELATED BOOKS:
Universal Grammar and American Sign Language
Language: en
Pages: 245
Authors: D.C. Lillo-Martin
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines
Type: BOOK - Published: 2012-12-06 - Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE American Sign Language (ASL) is the visual-gestural language used by most of the deaf community in the United States and parts of Canada. On the surface, this language (as all signed languages) seems radically different from the spoken languages which have been used to formulate theories of
Sign Language and Linguistic Universals
Language: en
Pages: 547
Authors: Wendy Sandler, Diane Lillo-Martin, Diane Carolyn Lillo-Martin
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines
Type: BOOK - Published: 2006-02-02 - Publisher: Cambridge University Press

This 2006 study compares sign languages with spoken languages, in order to seek their shared universal properties.
The Oxford Handbook of Universal Grammar
Language: en
Pages: 720
Authors: Ian Roberts
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines
Type: BOOK - Published: 2017-01-12 - Publisher: Oxford University Press

This handbook provides a critical guide to the most central proposition in modern linguistics: the notion, generally known as Universal Grammar, that a universal set of structural principles underlies the grammatical diversity of the world's languages. Part I considers the implications of Universal Grammar for philosophy of mind and philosophy
The Routledge Handbook of Theoretical and Experimental Sign Language Research
Language: en
Pages: 704
Authors: Josep Quer, Roland Pfau, Annika Herrmann
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines
Type: BOOK - Published: 2021-01-29 - Publisher: Routledge

The Routledge Handbook of Theoretical and Experimental Sign Language Research bridges the divide between theoretical and experimental approaches to provide an up-to-date survey of key topics in sign language research. With 29 chapters written by leading and emerging scholars from around the world, this Handbook covers the following key areas:
Sociolinguistic Variation in American Sign Language
Language: en
Pages: 237
Authors: Professor of Lingusitics Ceil Lucas, Ceil Lucas, Robert Bayley, Clayton Valli
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines
Type: BOOK - Published: 2001 - Publisher: Gallaudet University Press

This volume provides a complete description of ASL variation. People from varying regions and backgrounds have different ways of saying the same thing. For example, in English some people say "test," while others say "tes'," dropping the final "t." Noted scholars Ceil Lucas, Robert Bayley, and Clayton Valli led a